Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Do all writers, programs, and books fit somewhere on a continuum between MFA or NYC? The answer, as Harbach knows, is no. American fiction is one thing, not two. Dividing it into two cultures is as strange and artificial, in its way, as dividing the ocean on a map. Yet the distinctions are natural and in some cases essential, as long as we don’t forget that we made up these categories in the first place. The true, important achievement of MFA vs NYC is advancing an ongoing conversation about fiction begun by The Program Era. How does art flourish in an environment of institutional creativity? How do writers make money and produce literature at the same time? Ben Pfeiffer reviews MFA vs NYC (via therumpus)
Monday, March 31, 2014
lensblr-network:

Gorp en Roovert; Hilvarenbeek
by tdbrouwer.tumblr.com

This is what Monday morning should feel like.

lensblr-network:

Gorp en Roovert; Hilvarenbeek

This is what Monday morning should feel like.

Sunday, March 23, 2014

explore-blog:

Science writer Ed Yong takes a fascinating and chilling look at mind-controlling parasites.

Pair with this piece in The Atlantic about Jaroslav Flegr’s research

Saturday, March 22, 2014
There seems to be real immediacy in some of the YA books I’ve read. I suppose I tend to be a bit more language-focused in my adult novels; I will allow myself to linger in a passage, playing with it and letting it twirl around awhile in a way that I wouldn’t have felt was instinctively right for Belzhar, particularly because it’s in first-person, and in this case the narrator really wants and needs to get her experiences told now, and understood. Of course, language matters in both types of books (and I know there’s a lot of overlap in terms of who reads what). For me, a satisfying novel, whether it’s intended for teenagers or adults, or both, usually has a clear imperative, and is populated by characters we come to know very well…. And at the end of any satisfying novel, the reader probably feels: oh, I really know the way this writer thinks and describes things; I know this world. Meg Wolitzer, author of The Interestings and forthcoming YA novel Belzhar, on the difference between a YA novel and a novel for adults (via annaverity)

(Source: NPR)

Thursday, March 13, 2014
maggie-stiefvater:

guardian:

Wounded landscape: how Norway is remembering its 2011 massacre
Artist Jonas Dahlberg has been chosen to create three memorials, one of which cuts a 3.5m slit in the landscape, to remember the victims of Anders Behring Breivik. Read more
Picture: Jonas Dahlberg Studio

things people do to the planet, continued

maggie-stiefvater:

guardian:

Wounded landscape: how Norway is remembering its 2011 massacre

Artist Jonas Dahlberg has been chosen to create three memorials, one of which cuts a 3.5m slit in the landscape, to remember the victims of Anders Behring Breivik. Read more

Picture: Jonas Dahlberg Studio

things people do to the planet, continued

(Source: theguardian.com)

Saturday, January 18, 2014
If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales. Albert Einstein (via labelleleigh)

(Source: observando)

timeofwolves:

 

Foggy Day at Agate Bay, Two Harbors, M

The state of my home mirrors my mind.

seekingwhomhemaydevour:

A 1982 metro bus converted into a three bedroom traveling home in Brighton.

I’ll take it.

Thursday, January 16, 2014
Oh, Pooh.

Oh, Pooh.